Voices of YV4CA


Video Voices

Youth from Cambodia


Chhoeun Chanboramy

Chhoeun recently volunteered to support Asia-Pacific Climate Week 2019 in Bangkok, Thailand.

Youth from China


Liu Lele

Liu recently volunteered to support Asia-Pacific Climate Week 2019 in Bangkok, Thailand.


Lyutong Cai

Lyutong is a former young Technical Assistant with UNESCAP's Statistics Division in Bangkok, Thailand. There, she worked with Ocean Accounts and is passionate about linking SDG 13: Climate Action with SDG 14: Life Below Water. Hear Lyutong's thoughts on climate action in her interview below!


Yi Yeung, Hong Kong

Yi Yeung is a public information and marketing intern at ReliefWeb, UN OCHA. Hear his thoughts on climate action below!


Youth from India


Namitha Kuttiparambil & Annie Kukreja, India 


Partha Hazarika


Tharun Sathya Duvoor

Youth from Indonesia


Angeline Fransisca

Angeline is a young professional from Indonesia working in Japan.


 Kenji Marwies


Michelle Aprilia


Philip Tanjaya


Sherry Wong

Youth from Malaysia


Ashley Yong

Ashley is a Youth Representative of the Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation. Her work focuses on youth, gender, and environment. She is particularly passionate about SDG 13 and SDG 14.


Eshaan Menon

Eshaan is a Youth Advisory Council Member for Asia for the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA). Formerly, during his term as Youth Program Director at the United Nations Association of Malaysia (UNAM) Youth, he focused on expanding the reach of UNAM Youth through a digital membership platform as well as campus activities such as fundraisers and Town Halls. Most recently, Eshaan was a winner of the Reboot the Earth, a social coding event that brings young computer programmers, scientists and other interested people together under the auspices of the United Nations to improve upon or build a new software program that addresses the current climate crisis.


Yen Ning Wong

Yen Ning Wong is a young adult from Malaysia who was a youth representative of Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation


Yi Ching Yong

Is a young adult studying at Tzu Chi University.

Youth from Nepal


Pratibha Pant

Pratibha is a young professional from Nepal.


 

Youth from Philippines


John Leo Algo

John is a young professional in the field of environmental science and management. His interests include air quality, climate change, environmental modelling, governance and policies, and urban development. Hear his thoughts on climate action below!
 

Youth from the Republic of Korea


Sunghwan Park

Sunghwan is a consultant with UNESCAP’s Environment and Development Division in Bangkok, Thailand. He is working for the Seoul Initiative Network on Green Growth (SINGG) project which aims to strengthen the member states’ capacity in dealing with the climate change issues and to foster green growth in the region. Hear Sung's inputs on climate action in his interview below!


Youth from Sri Lanka


Saffran Mihnar

Saffran is a youth advocate focused on communication, campaigning, and negotiations with the ability to strategically identify, devise and implement solutions to global development. He works in empowering young people in the field of climate change and sustainable development. While having been engaged in the process for more than five years, he has contributed to the national and international youth platforms and communication at UNFCCC Sessions since COP21 as well as several other international conferences & workshops such as One Planet Summit, European Conference on Science Journalism, EuroScience Open Forums and High-level Meeting on “Climate and Sustainable Development for All.”

Youth from Thailand


Anna Sriratanasomboon


Akaraphum Pisanwanich

Akaraphum is a project manager for Earth Day Network Thailand.


Jacky Jaroenmoon

Jacky recently volunteered to support Asia-Pacific Climate Week 2019 in Bangkok, Thailand.


Jamie Lohwithee & Chalisn Phetdong


Jeta Jiranuntarat


Jongsuwat Angsuvarnsiri

Jongsuwat is from Thailand where he heads SAC Art Center, a not-for-profit platform for young and emerging artists to have a platform to showcase their works.


Punyapha Visavakornvisisd

Punyapha Visavakornvisisd runs the environmental awareness-raising organization YouthEN in Thailand.



Risa Sayama


Terachet Rojrachsombat

Terachet is a passionate advocate for climate action from Thailand. He has been involved with Climate Strike Thailand.

Youth from Vietnam


Vu Que Anh

Vu Que Anh is a young adult from Vietnam studying at Tzu Chi University.

Written Voices

Youth from Bangladesh


Mohammad Mahbubur Rahman (27)

"I urge to the decision makers of my country to consider youth voices and demands to be incorporated in the national climate policies and strategies to achieve SDGs and accomplish the declarations agreed in Paris Agreement."


Anonymous Female (22)

"The problem of the environment has been a subject of hot debate for the last decade. There is an opinion that if we keep rejecting responsibilities to take care of our own nature and human ecology, the human race is doomed to failure. The impacts of climate change are very vast. It effects every sector such as agriculture (water resources, forestry, food security), coastal areas (urban vulnerability, sea-level rise), and international policies."


Anonymous Male (22)

"Nowadays, the problem of changing climate conditions, particularly global warming, which is increasing through human activities, are the main issues. According to the SDGs, Goal 13 on climate action must strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate related disaster. Education and awareness-raising must be improved. Mechanisms for raising capacity for effective resilience and adaptation must be promoted.   Across the environmental, economic, and social dimensions their respective factors must be considered: materials, energy, water, biodiversity, and waste; ethical conduct, corruption, social justice, and labor practices; and corporate governance, economic contributions, and local economic development."  


Anonymous Male (22)

"The government should implement environmental policies to reduce climate change."


Anonymous Male (22)

"Climate change is a hot topic now. We are already facing the outputs of climate change, and definitely, this change is bad for our planet. The SDGs are good for our planet however, but the important question is, are we implementing the SDGS or not? I advocate for responsible consumption, and for the government and policy makers to take steps towards responsible consumption."


Anonymous Male (21)

"Actually, climate change is now creating major incidents which are not being faced. Now is the right time to develop a suitable plan because, without taking the appropriate steps or undergoing sustainable work, our doom day will arrive soon. Generally, we, the inhabitants of earth can easily make our future secure. And I think that developed countries have to come forward in this case."


Anonymous Male (22)

"Climate change is presently the most concerning issue. As the climate is changed by us, so too can we reduce climate change. Another concern is our policy. Every government must take initiative for better or worse against climate change. Our everyday lives depend on it."


Anonymous Male (21)

"Obviously, the issue of climate change is created by human beings and it is accelerating day by day with deleterious impact for the world. However, climate change can be positive if our consciousness becomes positive, so that we have to change our behavior positively. Then we will be able to protect our earth."  


Anonymous Male (22)

"Organizing workshops on climate change is highly appreciated because, nowadays, climate change is an unavoidable issue for human beings. In every activity, people somehow directly and indirectly affect it which has an adverse effect on us and our atmosphere. So, we should be concerned about climate actions that protect our environment."


Anonymous Female (21)

"My village is in the coastal area of southern Bangladesh. As a well-known place, it was damaged by both Cyclone Aila and Bulbul, hampering the rural economy. Many initiatives have been taken to address this, but none have been sustainable. So, adaptive capacities must be built and climate action integrated into national policy."


Anonymous female (23)

"In this period, climate change is a great issue and a buzz word. Global warming is rising. Sea-levels are rising. Ecosystems are in hazards way. In this situation, we must reduce vulnerability and take action against it. It also causes destruction to human health. So, we have to stop misusing our natural resources, restore forests, and control the population. It is the duty of not only the government but also all of us."  


Anonymous Male (21)

"Climate change is the most important problem in the current world. Day by day, our climate is changing and, because of this, we face different types of problems. Bangladesh is more vulnerable to climate change. Different types of disasters have occurred with food shortages, decreased life expectancy, extinction of wildlife, and etcetera. Individual concern and responsibilities should be important."


Anonymous Female (21)

"I am a person in society and we all are social people. Society created climate change and we have to be clear about it. Nowadays, our climate has changed in many ways and we take some action. First, we need to raise public awareness and the effects of positive change. Otherwise, there will be problems all over the world. So, need a guideline to maintain our climate and save our lives and society all over the world."


Anonymous Female (21)

"Climate change is a great problem for our country. Climate change creates not only environmental problems, but also economic and social ones. The impact of climate change creates vulnerability for the whole earth, which exposes us to many disasters both natural and entirely man made. So, we need to raise awareness for climate change and its impact."


Anonymous Female (22)

"As we know that Bangladesh is a developing country, our main concern is economic development, not environmental as it should be. In our everyday work, we harm our environment. We know all about this but won’t take any decision or step to protect the environment. We should try our best to protect the environment, preserving it for our future generations."


Anonymous Female

"Bangladesh is more vulnerable to climate change. Every year our country faces a great crisis, but some areas are affected in many ways. When we pollute our environment like this, sea-levels will ultimately submerge many areas. We are aware of climate change and have to take action against it."

 

Youth from India


Anonymous

"The Climate Crisis has emerged as one of the most crucial generational issues facing us as mankind today. The impact it has and will have on the generations to come is largely unforeseen and that is what is scary about it.

Rising concerns about the potential social, economic and environmental impacts of greenhouse gases have led to major debates at a global level about the possible mitigation and adaptation strategies that nations should undertake to help them transition to a low carbon development pathway. The problem is a collective one and if we choose to not act collectively, we are certainly doomed. 

What we fail to see is that every action we take has a direct impact on the climate and the burden of change is on us. The cutting down of forests in the name of development  like in the case of Arrey forest in Mumbai which has got a green signal for a metro construction project or mining of coal from the forests in Madhya Pradesh which has led to extensive loss of green cover.

India is extremely vulnerable to the climate impacts, for example increase in temperature can damage crops threatening food security or rise in sea level could submerge for coastal areas like Mumbai.  But, India is also now a major contributor to green house gases, being the 4th largest global emitter.  

The time to act is now and we need to be shouting and demanding positive climate action. As an organisation YWater is focused on collecting these voices and is working to amplify them so we can be stronger as a collective while demanding climate justice."


Anonymous Female (25)

"Understanding climate change and taking necessary actions on the grassroot level is the need of the hour. Globally, this topic is discussed but still, in India, many people are not aware of this change, its causes, and it's impact. I believe each and every person on this planet should make a contribution to tackle this change. This should be progressively discussed in schools and villages. It is OUR responsibility to secure life of every living being on Earth….If there is an option to be chose between nature and development, chose nature!"


Anonymous Female (27)

"Awareness should be raised among every citizen in the society especially among the lower income groups."
 

Madhan Raja (25)

"It is hard to accept that even after the cruel effects from disasters like the Kerala and Mozambique floods, Cyclone Fani and Titli, and severe winters all over the world, the policy makers still act as if they are deaf…no major action has been taken. To keep the Paris agreement alive, we need to reduce the aggregate demand of all goods and services and enact effective deforestation and effective afforestation."
 

Momi Das (24), Guwahati

We would like the policymakers and changemakers to take a bottom up approach, parallel with global collaboration. Grassroots level work to persuade change in the behaviour of people and raise awareness will disable ignorance. Policy is there but proper implementation is not, as in the case of banning single use plastic and segregating solid waste at source. The setting up of a State Wetland Authority for regulatory mechanism of wetlands will safeguard and conserve wetlands that host great biodiversity. Enacting sustainable development strategies will enable a halt on the cutting of age-old trees and safeguard an ecosystem. 


Shijin Varghese (27)

"Climate Change is a major issue happening. In our area, floods and landslides occur only because of human activity. Regulations should be more strict and the follow-up very thorough. Also, people should be aware and they should not damage the natural resources."


YWater (Youth Organization)

"The Climate Crisis has emerged as one of the most crucial generational issues facing us as mankind  today. The impact it has and will have on the generations to come is largely unforeseen and that is what is scary about it. 

Rising concerns about the  potential social, economic and environmental impacts of greenhouse gases have led to major debates at a global level about the possible mitigation and adaptation strategies that nations should undertake to help them transition to a low carbon development pathway.

The problem is a collective one and if we choose to not act collectively, we are certainly doomed. 
What we fail to see is that every action we take has a direct impact on the climate and the burden of change is on us. The cutting down of forests in the name of development  like in the case of Arrey forest in Mumbai which has got a green signal for a metro construction project or mining of coal from the forests in Madhya Pradesh which has led to extensive loss of green cover.

India is extremely vulnerable to the climate impacts, for example increase in temperature can damage crops threatening food security or rise in sea level could submerge for coastal areas like Mumbai.  But, India is also now a major contributer to green house gases, being the 4th largest gloabl emitter.  

The time to act is now and we need to be shouting and demanding positive climate action. As an organisation YWater is focused on collecting these voices and is working to amplify them so we can be stronger as a collective while demanding climate justice."

Youth from Malaysia


Yong Yi Ching (21), Perlis

"Our country, Malaysia, has very rich rainforest resources. However, one of our main exports is palm oil. Undeniably, this is the main income contributing to the economy. On the contrary, deforestation will be carried out to plant the oil palm trees. It sounds sad because it brings contradictory effects to our hometown. Thus, I hope our government would plant more trees to mitigate this situation. Moreover, I am living in Perlis which is the smallest and the least developed state in Malaysia, the obvious thing that I could experience due to climate change is heavy rain that brings detrimental consequences in the form of flash floods. The sewage system in my residential area is so vulnerable in the face of the threat of flash flood. Many of our belongings and furniture will be damaged due to the flooding that overwhelms us abruptly. So, I wish there to be a policy aimed to improve the sewage system to protect the citizens living in the suburban areas as they are living peacefully with the environment and they need to be seen."

Youth from Nepal


Sushmita Karki, Kathmandu

"Nepal, already being one of the least developed countries in the world, struggles to combat the negative impacts of climate change. Increased flooding, temperature, and disease impact all social, economic, and political aspects of Nepal. How can we save the remaining forest areas? How can we protect the local communities from being the victim of floods? How can we control landslides? We must formulate plans and allocate budget and resources for specific plans. We must engage youth by organising workshops, letting youth directly participate in projects. Implementation is more important than advocacy! Let’s save what we have and then focus on building something new!"

Youth from Pakistan


Muhammad Talha Khan (23) 

"First of all, in my country, the majority of the people are unaware of climate change and they are contributing to it unintentionally. The Government, meanwhile, is unable to make stable policy regarding climate change. Second, we are still using vehicles that generate sulphur while most of our refineries still don't comply to even euro2 standard of gasoline and diesel. Policy making is the key to tackle climate change."

Youth from Papua New Guinea


Daisy Margaret Parascos (25)

"Rising sea levels are now a major issue in our country. I write on behalf of Milne Bay Island communities. Milne Bay Province is the biggest maritime province and most people live out on the far-flung islands and rarely gets visited by government organizatiosn to educate and raise awareness on such issues and their negative impacts. So, my appeal to policy makers is to come down to local settings and try to get their views and to actually see the real impacts and effects of rising sea level. I am currently advocating for marine conservation as the sea is our garden and protecting it will mean the generation after me will benefit."

Jessie Ketan (27)

"I would like the policy makers of my country to write workable policies that safeguard indigenous people from climate change and its effects.  

Awareness programs must be carried out efficiently so that climate change becomes a concern to our people for today and the future. 

Climate change is a serious issue and must be given priority when addressing it. Our small islands in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are experiencing rising sea levels and are finding it difficult to survive, land in PNG belongs to the people and when relocation exercises occurs, victims find it hard to settle in the new resettlement areas hence our government must work with our local people to reserve land for such relocation purposes. 

Something need to be done soon and not later."

Joe Harry (28)

"Climate change is a monster that needs to be controlled well and hunted down by every citizen of any nation. It cannot affect single country but the entire global village. 

The policy makers and politicians really need to make it their responsibility to take policies regarding climate change seriously at this time. We cannot continue to live and consume and do things to expand and grow our economy but we must be very careful about our actions.

Climate change is for real and better policies are needed to be integrated into our development policies."

Youth from Thailand


Gareth Billingham, Bangkok

My name is Gareth. I am an International student from South Africa. I have studied in South Africa, Norway, and am currently in Thailand studying International Relations and Global Affairs.

Climate change has greatly impacted my family and I in many ways. My mother and I, for example, are extremely sensitive to car fumes, smoke, and dust which is ever so present within our community in Thailand. Due to the large amounts of crops that are harvested in Thailand, there is also a burning season whereby the crops are burnt and an enormous amount of smoke hovers over the city for months until the first rainfall arrives. This burning season is a difficult time for all of us as we have to withstand the heat while wearing masks, we all incur large bills due to us never wanting to leave the house, and our fitness and health routines become completely lopsided. I do believe however that because of the current COVID-19 situation, and the halt of all non-essential tasks and travels, many individuals and companies have realised that what they where doing before, which caused an abundance of air pollution, was simply not necessary. We can see this in the huge drop of CO2 levels since the pandemic began. Quarantine and ‘stay at home orders’ have opened eyes around the world and has made everyone realise that a change needs to be made with all the non-essential, harmful actions that businesses have been taking.

I personally have never seen the air so clear in the north of Thailand as it is right now with everybody staying at home. It is a sad reality how the world must come to a complete standstill for the earth to heal, however it has brought to light how much damage we humans are doing in our daily lives. I recommend that we, as the newer generations should take this time to look at the self-healing currently occurring and then look at all non-essential travels and production that have been stopped. If we look at this, we will start to realise that we have been doing things wrong, and the way tasks are carried out today, no matter how strenuous, actually turns out to be more beneficial then our ‘normal’ way of life.

Krerkkrai Songin (25), Bangkok

"Climate change should be treated as an urgent issue. Our economy is based on many unsustainable use of resource and rapid change could pose a threat or interrupter to the well being of the economy. However, changes are needed for the long-term survival of our society and species. As impacts of climate change are getting more and more severe, changes are needed to start action now. Strong leadership from the government and private sectors is needed for leading people towards a sustainable future. I believe more investment in sustainable replacements for our unsustainable production of food and energy should be done and taken seriously. With this vital economic change, we might need to reconsider our structure of supply chain for it to be possible. We must dissolve the demand for unsustainable way of life and encourage the sustainable one to create more sustainable supply. This means we need to start working on our economic structure along with the mind of the people right now."

Quotes

Youth from India

 

Momi Das


 

Youth from the Republic of Korea
 Yujin Jang

 

From Outside the Asia-Pacific Region


Written Statements

Youth from Spain


Paloma Abad, 25

"We are not doing enough. Spain is a country with a lot of sun, how is it possible that solar panels for renewable energy are not encouraged but people who wants them bump into enormous hazards?"

Youth from Equatorial Guinea


José Beltrán Esono

First of all, I will start by saying that where I come from, the African continent, suffers the effects of climate change with greater virulence, despite the fact that it is only guilty of 3% of Greenhouse Gas emissions.  The drastic reduction in rainfall in many regions is already evidence of climate change. The country that saw me born, Equatorial Guinea, and a large part of Africa, has suffered from the beginning of 2016 the greatest drought ever recorded.  This is the penultimate example of the effects we are already experiencing as a consequence of climate change.  Changes are manifested with greater intensity in the impoverished regions of the planet. Furthermore, the African climate is deeply conditioned by the seas, which are experiencing a continuous rise in temperature and acidification. With this climate change, the majority of the population that has an economic sustenance and lives from agriculture, livestock, and fishing will be affected. The continuous succession of these phenomena from years ago is translating into famines, social revolts and grea,  migratory flows.

The countries with the highest cumulative GHG emissions have an obligation, not only for mitigation, but also to contribute to the full achievement of human rights in the region. Projects to curb climate change, which come from abroad, should be enabled and implemented. It is also necessary for Africans to become the active subjects of a change based on climate justice, with special attention to empowering women and youth. There must be an urgent transfer of technology, knowledge, and financing from the North to the South in the African continent.  The challenges of climate change, to be addressed, are huge and real, with priority being given to achieving food sovereignty in the present and for the future. Therefore, it is necessary to promote autonomous and citizen projects that favor systems resistant to climate change.

 

Additional Material


Snapshot: Asia-Pacific Climate Week 2019


Asia-Pacific Climate Week: Snapshots 


Group Statement

 

I am Climate Justice


See the real faces and stories of youth advocates from the Community of YV4CA partner organization I Am Climate Justice


Click here!

7th Asian Youth Forum


See some unique youth voices from the 7th Asian Youth Forum below:
 

Climate actions: what are youth doing for climate change

Document

Click here


Views from the AYF

Document

Click here

 

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