Institutional Mechanisms for SDG Coordination

P4R: Follow-up to the VNRs: Experiences and lessons learnt

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development encourages member states to ‘conduct regular and inclusive reviews of progress at the national and sub-national levels’. Reviewing the implementation of the 2030 Agenda is not an end in itself but a means to improve and accelerate implementation. During the VNR countries take stock of and assess progress and shortcomings in the implementation of the goals and targets. This process is a dynamic one wherein countries are constantly implementing, assessing and readjusting their policies to achieve the goals.

Financing for Sustainable Development Report 2019

The 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report (FSDR) of the Inter-agency Task Force on Financing for Development warns that mobilizing sufficient financing remains a major challenge in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Despite signs of progress, investments that are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) remain underfunded and parts of the multilateral system are under strain.

Sustainable Development Provisions in Investment Treaties

Foreign investment has been and still is an important factor for the economic development of many countries, especially developing countries. Transnational investment activities bring about the needed capital and technology to the host states, but they may also give rise to sustainable development concerns, such as environmental and labour rights concerns. To many developing countries, such concerns could be particularly profound.

Handbook on Negotiating Sustainable Development Provisions in Preferential Trade Agreements

A proliferation of regional trade agreements (RTAs) has been witnessed across the world but also in the Asia-Pacific region, which has contributed to its trade-driven growth. Indeed, over the last three decades, the Asia-Pacific region has experienced export-oriented development, with economic growth closely linked to a reduction in poverty levels. This has increasingly occurred through improved integration into regional and global value and supply chains, which has been central to Asian growth.

Strategies for SDG National Reporting: A Review of Current Approaches and Key Considerations for Government Reporting on the UN Sustainable Development Goals

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted in 2015, are a historic commitment to take on the world’s most pressing and intractable problems. Through the SDGs, 193 UN Member States have agreed to address poverty, hunger, climate change, gender equity, and other global issues and to make major progress by the year 2030. National governments are now developing plans to address their countries’ own priorities in the context of this major global effort.

Achieving the SDGs with National Reporting Platforms: Lessons Learned from the SDG National Reporting Initiative

Publishing and disseminating data and statistics on the SDG indicators - referred to as SDG reporting - can be a valuable tool to help national governments achieve their goals by enabling policymakers to understand where their country stands in relation to the SDG targets, and how far they still need to go. Government officials can use this data to adjust their country’s development strategies, inform the distribution of resources, and engage stakeholders around specific goals.

Environmental Change Through Participation

Environment-related sustainable development goals have shown the least progress across Asia-Pacific countries. In tandem, regional reports, civil society and the news call attention to the increased vulnerability and marginality of specific groups of people in society – such as those exposed to climate change, migrant workers, or those affected by air pollution. More understanding is needed regarding the engagement of marginal and vulnerable groups who lie at the frontiers of environmental change.

Tackling Integrity Risks in Government Contracts

This Guidebook is designed as a practical methodology to help countries diagnose integrity risks in the public procurement system and processes, as well as to indicate proper actions to mitigate them. In addition, the Guidebook is designed to help governments in the region upgrade their procurement systems during the Second Review Cycle of the UN Convention against Corruption (2017-2021).