Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience

ICTD Case Study 2: ICT for Disaster Risk Reduction

The second issue of the Asian and Pacific Training Centre for Information and Communication Technology for Development’s (APCICT) ICTD Case Study Series, ICT for Disaster Risk Reduction, discusses the ways in which ICT has positively impacted the various phases of disaster management. Noting the use of ICT during and in the immediate aftermath of disasters like the Indian Ocean Tsunami, and most recently the Haiti Earthquake, the case studies examine the important role ICTs play in disaster preparedness, response and mitigation.

Ready for the Dry Years: Building resilience to drought in South-East Asia

South-East Asia is regularly hit by droughts. Ready for the Dry Years offers a clear analysis of this subject, assessing prospects for the decades ahead and highlighting the principal risks. Though starting slowly, droughts can have devastating cumulative impacts – striking hardest at the poor and heightening inequality, as well as degrading land and increasing the prospects of conflict. The study shows that there will be many more dry years ahead, and the area affected by drought is likely to shift and expand.

Policy Coherence for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience: From Evidence to Implementation

Disaster risk reduction and resilience is crucial to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Embedded across the SDGs, disaster risk reduction is an enabler of more than a dozen goals spanning food security, human health, infrastructure, and ecosystem-related targets. Enhancing policy coherence among the SDGs and across the 2030 Development Agendas requires an approach that can be adapted to the specific circumstances, context and needs of countries.

A Review of Domestic Data Sources for Climate Finance Flows in Recipient Countries

Improved national financial monitoring systems will increase accountability on climate change spending and foster transparency for global efforts to reach the goals outlined through the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, according to a joint study by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Latin American and Caribbean Climate Finance Group (GFLAC).

Addressing gender and climate change adaptation in Viet Nam’s agriculture sectors

According to the global climate risk index, Viet Nam is one of the ten nations most vulnerable to climate change impacts. Typhoons and other extreme weather events are increasing. 

Another impact is sea level rise, which is leading to saline intrusion, destroying rice fields and other crops. 

Women farmers now form the majority of agricultural workers in the province because men are migrating to cities to work.

Addressing Gender in Climate Change Policies for Agriculture

Men and women often have different roles and responsibilities in society and therefore experience climate change impacts in different ways. This video shows what Viet Nam, Uganda and Colombia are doing to develop gender-responsive national adaptation plans for the agriculture sectors. This country-driven work is carried out under a global programme known as Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans (NAP-Ag), jointly coordinated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).