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The quadrennial Global Sustainable Development Report was commissioned by the Member States of the United Nations in 2016, to help inform the 2019 SDG Summit. It has been drafted by an independent group of 15 scientists appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General.

The goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will guide development policy action over the coming years, in the pursuit of a revitalised Global Partnership for Sustainable Development. The eradication of poverty is among the most prominent of the Sustainable Development Goals, and the challenge of poverty eradication is the greatest for the least developed countries, where almost half of the population still lives in extreme poverty.

The 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report (FSDR) of the Inter-agency Task Force on Financing for Development warns that mobilizing sufficient financing remains a major challenge in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Despite signs of progress, investments that are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) remain underfunded and parts of the multilateral system are under strain.

Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in 2016, scientist have been studying its “indivisible whole” nature, with the objectives to propose viable methods and tools for integrated planning of the implementation of the 17 SDGs. The three dimensions of sustainable development as outlined by the 2030 Agenda—economic prosperity, social justice and environmental protection—are viewed as “intertwined”, like three strands of the DNA.

Foreign investment has been and still is an important factor for the economic development of many countries, especially developing countries. Transnational investment activities bring about the needed capital and technology to the host states, but they may also give rise to sustainable development concerns, such as environmental and labour rights concerns. To many developing countries, such concerns could be particularly profound.

A proliferation of regional trade agreements (RTAs) has been witnessed across the world but also in the Asia-Pacific region, which has contributed to its trade-driven growth. Indeed, over the last three decades, the Asia-Pacific region has experienced export-oriented development, with economic growth closely linked to a reduction in poverty levels.

The Asia-Pacific region faces a daunting spectrum of natural hazards. Indeed, many countries could be reaching a tipping point beyond which disaster risk, fuelled by climate change, exceeds their capacity to respond.

With the establishment of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, the Human Development Forum at Tudor Rose has expanded its publishing operation with the creation of a series of volumes entitled A Better World, each dedicated to one or more of the 17 SDGs. This volume, published in May 2019, covers Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

This volume of the Water Journal focusing on SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation is broken down into four components: "For Sustainable Development," "How to ease financing the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 6 to 'Ensure Availability and Sustainable Management of Water and Sanitation for All' ," "Environmental standards of Japan: History and Prospects," and "Building the Sustainable Society from the Water Perspective"

The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-08 was the worst to hit the world economy since the Great Depression. The Crisis devastated the financial markets, brought the housing and banking sectors to their knees, and caused political upheaval in both the developed and developing world.